A LODOS VACATION IN 2020: What to bring (& what to leave at home)

You will be living on a boat. That means, you should pack very light. A soft-sided carry on is ideal if you can swing it! 

Lodos at Isla Isabel with a Blue Boobie

CLOTHING:

  • Former guests say even though they brought very little, it was still too much! You can do laundry if needed, and the dolphins don’t care if they see you in the same outfits!
  • Loose, lightweight, breathable, easy fabrics that dry quick are best (avoid denim and heavy cotton)
  • Swimsuits & coverups, 2 pair of shorts, summer dress, 3-4 tees
  • Depending on the time of year, packing layers is a good idea – a long sleeve shirt or fleece
  • Comfy clothes to lounge around in throughout the day (e.g. yoga pants, sweats, leggings)
  • 1 nicer outfit/shirt to go out in the evening or while on shore/in port – wrinkle resistant ideal, collared shirt for the guys
  • 1-2 hats (ideally something with a strap, so you don’t lose it in the wind – Neptune already has more baseball hats and sunglasses than he needs!)
  • 1-3 pair of shoes: non marking, non skid soled shoes (e.g. light weight tennis shoes or treaded sandals), shoes you can get wet/flip flops for marina showers, hiking shoes/sandals, and something to wear to a nicer dinner. We don’t recommend going barefoot on the boat when it’s moving, but feel free to be barefoot while lounging. Inside the boat, we ask you to remove your shoes.
  • Personal items (e.g. chapstick, toothbrush, moisturizer w/ sunscreen)

LUGGAGE:

  • Duffels or backpacks are ideal, something compressible/malleable to fold into smaller spaces
  • Small tote or dry bag for marina showers, dinghy-ing to a shore destination, keeping your phone/camera safe, going on land adventures, etc. are better than a bulky purse

PERSONAL/ENTERTAINMENT:

  • Motion sickness meds, patches and sea bands if you get sea sick 
  • Downloaded music that can be played on bluetooth without wifi 
  • Books/Kindle and/or magazines
  • Puzzle books or other non-wifi entertainment vehicles (we have games and cards on board)
Relaxing in the Cockpit

THINGS TO LEAVE AT HOME:

  • Sunscreen, soap, shampoo, bug spray, towels, jackets, life jackets, binoculars, other extras you may have forgotten
  • Basic medicine/first aid
  • Solar charger or external battery (we have iPhone/solar chargers on board)
  • Goggles/snorkel gear
  • Makeup, curling irons, hair dryers, heeled shoes, big purses, lots of jewelry
  • Headlamp/flashlights
Sailing on a close reach in the Sea of Cortez

Dodging the Wind

On a mooring ball, looking northwest, at Puerto Escondido

I know we are supposed to seek wind since we are on a sailboat, but the weather plays such a huge role in where we can travel, how fast, how safely and how comfortably. Luckily, there have been no signs of hurricanes yet – they are just on the “E”s (Erick) and “F”s (Flossie), and they are still far south and west of us. August and September ups the risk, so we are trying to stay close to hurricane holes and/or places we are get to in a day in case of the worst news. 

Aside from hurricanes, there are other wind/weather conditions we have to be mindful of: 

  • Coromuels – SW wind that usually howls during the night (making for a very unpleasant sleep and rocky, swelly anchorage)
  • Elifantes – Big winds that sweep off the land and last 6+hours making it dangerous for passage making and anchoring.
  • Chubascos – A fast tornodo/hurricane like storm that lasts minutes but can pounce unannounced with winds that could rip the boat apart or toss it onto rocks. 

All of these things make us cautious where we go and where we sleep at night, obsessively checking the weather while trying not to let it interrupt our fun – we try to follow the 7 Ps: Prior Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance 🙂 

Video of Puerto Escondido Mooring Field

I have a business trip mid August and mid September, so I will hopefully be able to leave Kirby and Lodos safely in one of the hurricane holes on the west side of the Sea.  That current place is Puerto Escondido (click on link for more info and a video of the area). A reinforced natural bay that is protected from mountains on nearly every side and curves inward to a protected anchorage on mooring balls with a small marina. Every year in May, they have a huge fishing tournament which brings people here from all over the world.

A good place to work on the boat and tick off those maintenance projects!

Puerto Escondido boasts the most expensive marina in the Sea – reinforcing why they call it the Gringo Coast. The marina fees here are higher than marinas in southern California. When we were here last time, the daily fees for our boat were 4x what we paid in San Diego, so we stay out on the mooring ball.

They have decent internet, a little restaurant that makes amazing pizzas in an outdoor oven, the best air conditioned luxury bathrooms and showers, a little store (tienda) and easy access into Loreto that has an international airport with direct flights to San Diego/Tijuana. They also have a cruisers net on VHF Channel 22 at 8am daily to keep people informed of weather and other happenings – always ending with a silly sailing joke (the one today was about a pirate). Cheesy, yes, but with a dash of earnestness that even the most cynical person can embrace.

Making guacamole with the best avocados in the world: ugly outside, perfect inside!

Back in the Sea of Cortez – during hurricane season…

I love the familiarity with the sea, the anchorages, the wildlife and impending challenges we will no doubt encounter while sailing. The big difference for this 2 weeks, is that we don’t have internet, and I feel that I need it for work, which has created a new set of problems or anxiety – needing to be in a specific place for a phone call or meeting isn’t exactly the safest way to sail/travel, as it forces you to make potentially compromised decisions on weather that you might not have otherwise.

Sunset in Caleta Partida

We started this trip with a few days in Caleta Partida – an anchorage that divides two islands, and which has a narrow channel that we can take our dinghy through to get from one side of the island to the other. It’s one of our favorite places because it’s sheltered and protected but also because it’s the home to dozens of turtles.

Kirby cleaning the hull
Jodi snorkeling with sea lions

On our way to our next anchorage at San Francisco Island, we made a quick stop at a couple small islands that are home to hundreds of sea lions. The pup season ends in July. Kirby anchored the boat in a deep rocky islet while I jumped off and swam with them. They warned me to not get too close by barking at me – they were adorable and fun to see up close, and of course swimming with sea lions is pretty special.

Heading north to Isla San Francisco, we happened upon a group of 5-7 giant manta rays feeding at the surface. We stopped the boat to watch them eat, and then saw them soar under the boat with wingspans of more than 10 feet, mouths open, breathtaking….

After arriving in Isla SF, we stayed at two separate anchorages – we found some fantastic dive/snorkeling sites and appreciated the rich variety and diversity of the fish – so many we’d never seen before and that are indigenous to the Sea: Golden phase puffer fish, Cortez round ray, Cortez angel fish, and dozens of others – including 4 types of parrot fish.

Bahia Agua Verde

Our next stop was one of our favorites – at Bahia Agua Verde – but we had to scoot up to Puerto Escondido (where we are now on a mooring ball) as our refrigeration is on the fritz, we need to do laundry and dump our trash 🙂 We’ll be here for a bit while we catch up on work and projects, and I plan for my next trip to the USA for work.

And, it’s hot. So hot. ~100 degrees and nearly the same in humidity. We are having trouble keeping the fridge and freezer working properly it’s so hot….but, we are swimming and relaxing and doing our best to breath our way through it as the benefits outweigh the annoyances.

Back in La Paz

After crossing the Sea of Cortez and making a near record beat south, we are happy to have settled back at Marina de la Paz, where we spent a few happy weeks last year and vowed to return in 2019.

Lunch at The Dock overlooking our marina

La Paz is the quiet, authentic, hippy-sister to Cabo, without the Spring Break party scene and huge resorts. Incredible beaches are nearby as is extreme wildlife and protected underwater parks while also close to two international airports,

Sunset over La Paz bay

We welcomed our first visitors! Seth & Daniela came all the way from Michigan; it was the perfect way to enjoy re-entry back into the city we fondly remembered. We ate great food, enjoyed beautiful beaches, and each other’s company.

Seth, Daniela & Kirby in their natural habitats
Seth getting a shot of Saguaro cactuses, mangroves & torquoise waters

The sailing club we belong to here is putting on their Bayfest festival this week, and we just finished watching the Tour de France race that was in town this weekend. Next weekend is the La Paz Jazz Fest which supports Mar Libre – a local marine conservation organization, so there is no shortage of things to keep us busy and entertained!

The remote “Office”
Lodos sitting pretty on B Dock

However, with lots of real work to do in the coming months, it will also be fun to be dock potatoes for awhile as we make trips back and forth to the US for work and enjoy being “residents” of Mexico again.

We hope to see you here sometime!

Crossing the Sea of Cortez

LODOS IS BACK IN THE WATER!

After being “on the hard” (out of the water) for nearly 6 months, we have decided that we are never ever leaving the boat again. <LOL> Well, probably not, but that’s how we feel right now.

We got stuck in San Carlos for so much longer than we’d hoped – there were only a few days in the month of January and February that we could even get our boat back in the water; the marinas are fairly shallow, and our boat has a deep draft, so with mere inches to spare, we needed to get the boat into the water right at the peak of high tide. We missed one date in January but managed to successfully launch her on 1/21/19.  Taking the boat in and out of the water is one of the most nerve wracking things I’ve ever watched.

We spent 2-3 weeks doing nothing but cleaning and organizing and rebuilding the boat so she was ready to set sail in March. But, then we discovered that when the workers covered our solar panels last winter with a tarp – seeking shade – it drained our batteries to the point that they were destroyed and wouldn’t hold a charge. They don’t carry our batteries in Mexico, so it meant driving back to the USA again for us…..a very expensive lesson (many thousands of dollars later), we realized we have to be more vigilant if we ever leave the boat alone again.

After our final repairs, we finally set sail at midnight on March 18th, which is a national holiday in Mexico. It took us 17+ hours to cross the Sea, and we were happy to see our dolphin friends around 3am to keep us alert and engaged. You generally hear them before you see them at night – it sounds like someone blowing water out of a snorkel.

Our abbreviated itinerary in between tight weather windows:

  • Midnight on the 18th left San Carlos/Marina Real
  • Arrived Caleta San Juanico at 4pm 18th
  • Left San Juanico for Puerto Escondido at 8am on 19th
  • Arrived PE at 3pm & waited out the bad weather Wed-Thurs
  • Arrived Island of San Francisco at 5:30pm on 3/23 – very rolly anchorage due to strong NW wind that kicked up from 7pm-3am
  • Left Isla SF 8:45am on 3/23 for La Paz – arrived La Paz at 4pm

We saw whales and dolphins everyday – sometimes multiple times/day – keeping our pristine daily record in tact!

Our daily dolphin visit!