Living in Turkey During Hurricane Season

We’ve taken a break from blogging since we aren’t on Lodos right now, but we have received a lot of questions about where we are, what we are doing and when we’ll be back on the boat, or in the states, so I decided to take each question as a separate blog post – watch this space!

We sailed to San Carlos, Mexico in early/mid June and spent a couple of weeks getting the boat ready to be taken out of the water. We left Lodos in a ship yard there, “on the hard” (out of the water) because we needed to finish some work on the boat that we never got around to before leaving San Diego. We also had to redo work that was done improperly in San Diego – hopefully the last of the projects that all have had to be redone in the past 6 months+.

It’s hurricane season in Mexico. It officially starts in June and ends in November, but truly, the most dangerous time is August-September (when the water warms above 80+ degrees), so we knew we wanted to be out of there this season. We took the time to do some traveling this summer and see friends. We went to our cousin’s wedding in Dallas (beautiful!), and we stopped to see friends in London, Oxford, Paris and Amsterdam.

4 years ago, we bought a house in Turkey. It’s a tiny house (1 bed + 1 bath with a loft), in an “off the grid” community, in a remote new village on the Aegean Sea along the Datça peninsula. It has all the challenges of new (cheap) construction, plus layer in remote access, very little internet, spotty electricity (100% solar), and very rocky soil that we are trying to completely transform (sometimes through sheer will & grit alone).

All that said, the houses and community aren’t the reason we bought a place here. It’s the landscape and beauty that surrounds us. We are butted against mountains to the East that look something like Halfdome in Yosemite or Lake Tahoe in California and to the West, the shimmering blue of the Aegean – with the Greek Island of Kos facing directly in front of us. We are ~1 hour from the nearest city (However, there is a small village 20+ minutes from us.), and probably the only thing that keeps this place from major development is the winding, dirt-pitted road you must take through the olive and almond trees planted into the mountainsides. The food is amazing, and the cost of living is cheap – cheaper everyday as the Lira continues to fall…

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View from the beach – aka: “the office”

It’s the kind of place people want to go to write a book, paint, read, and escape.

The flora isn’t diverse, but it is lush. We are frequented by goats who local shepherds still graze and let roam freely. We have seen owls and wild boar, bats, grouse and deer. The night is pitch black, the stars bright, and the beach is pebbly (not sand), which I much prefer. It’s safe and quiet, and all of the neighbors know each other – we look after one another, share tea and treats and stories – the way it should be in a community.

Our languid days are filled with equal parts work (professional work: Jodi is consulting & Kirby is starting a new business), work on the house and yard as well as swimming, hiking, reading, cooking and sleeping. There is nothing to buy, nothing to schedule and not much to do.

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Sunsets from the back porch

Living in a developing country has its drawbacks of course, and we find it quite manic some days, but its lesson is to be open to what may come, be open to changing your plans, and realize that you have very little control over the outcomes of many things here – it’s a country and place that forces the zen out of you.

 

Leaving Lodos…& Mexico

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Lodos in Santa Rosalia Marina

As we get ready to leave Mexico and leave Lodos for the summer and hurricane season, it’s a bittersweet feeling. We are excited about the next months of adventures that await, but I know we’ll miss our daily life on the water.  In fact, we already do. It’s been great to leave from San Carlos, as it’s not a place we particularly like, so we aren’t sad to leave.

We once thought we’d spend one season in the Sea of Cortez and keep heading head south, but now, I’m really happy that we’ll be here for another year! I haven’t gotten enough of its beauty and rich rich wildlife.

I will especially miss:

  • Being at anchor reading, thinking and relaxing.
  • Seeing dolphins, whales, turtles and mobula rays almost daily.
  • Guacamole and churros.
  • The routine of living and working on the boat.
  • Sleeping 8 hours at a stretch – maybe for the first time in my life.
  • Playing games and splashing around in the clear blue sea.
  • The Mexican people & their generous, kind hospitality.

This ~5 months has raced by. We’ve learned so much, had so much fun, didn’t sink the boat, and we didn’t die. So, yeah, I guess it was a successful season. 😉

This week, we’re off to Dallas to celebrate a wedding, then onto London, Paris, Amsterdam and Turkey – adventures abound! Join us somewhere or consider joining us on Lodos when we get her back into the water in Mexico!

 

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J & K at Playa Algodones in the Sea of Cortez

 

Santa Rosalia: A French town in a Mexican Village

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IMG_2819 2Santa Rosalia was copper mining city for many years, and today, it’s also a jumping off point to cross the Sea of Cortez. With the shortest distance between two points (74nm), we will leave this town Thursday for San Carlos, on the mainland of Mexico – ending our Baja sailing season for 2018 and getting ready for hurricane season. The copper mining has left its mark with trains and mining equipment which was used to bring timber here from the Pacific NW – nearly all of the town and houses here are made from wood, which is highly unusual for the Baja.

 

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Leaving north for Santa Rosalia

 

This is our first marina since La Paz, over 3 weeks ago. We love being “on the hook” (at anchor), but it’s nice to pop into a marina every now and then to have a proper shower, do laundry, have endless supplies of electricity and explore a town.

 

 

There is a large French influence here, and it’s reflected in the architecture, the church and the bakery. The church was designed and built by Gustave Eiffel (yes, that Eiffel) for the Paris world fair in the late 1800s, then disassembled and shipped across the ocean to land here in this little town. It’s hard to see in the pictures, but it’s 100% steel and the internal ceiling looks like a boat with its trusses and support structures.

The bakery has delicious breads and baguettes – Mexican sweet bread cooked in 100+ year old wood ovens in a French style. Outstanding and delicious. (I had a churro here that was divine, too).

 

The bird life in the marina is outstanding – herons, pelicans, osprey, cormorants, terns and egrets are everywhere. I saw my first yellow-crowned night heron here – a lovely little heron with amber eyes and plumey feathers.

Next stop: San Carlos/Nuevo Guaymas 

LIFE ABOARD LODOS: “a day in the life”

While we have been reporting on our whereabouts, I thought it would be good to post a “day in the life” of the Lodos crew (aka Jodi & Kirby).

Generally, our day starts when the sun rises. It’s hard to stay in bed when the sun comes streaming through a porthole window or overhead hatch; you only have to turn over in our bed to look outside to see the bright blue sky mirrored in the turquoise waters that surround us everyday.

In several towns or marinas, they also have a cruiser’s net, which is usually broadcast on VHF channel 22 around 8am. It’s a helpful and hilarious summary of the goings on of the area and almost always includes: emergencies and urgent issues, weather, wind, tides, a peso report, advice, swaps & trades, local news, and the occasional joke. I found a great endodontist and a (free) aluminum pole for my chamois mop on such a broadcast. It’s a fascinating peak inside the cruiser lifestyle.

working

 

We have been trying to stay in/near places that have wifi or Telcel service, so that I can do some work part-time. Kirby has another project in the works as well, so he spends a few hours a week on this, too. I have a few perches where I like to work – out in the cockpit under the bimini where it’s shady, or inside at our salon table. In a marina, I may use a conference room in a marina or sit in a common space where the wifi signals are stronger.

 

Breakfast consists of cereal, fruit, smoothies in the Vitamix or oatmeal. There are always boat projects to complete, some more urgent than others, but it’s likely we’ll complete something everyday to ensure the boat is working properly.

We have been cooking on the boat a lot, and with the heat, we eat less and usually vegan/plant-based meals. Kirby has mastered the art of breadmaking in this Japanese machine (Zojirushi) that makes a small loaf perfect for two people over a few days. We need to ensure our boat batteries are charged up because it takes a lot of energy to run this thing – usually the solar and wind power can keep up, or we will make bread when we have the engine running or are making water. My favorite piece of kitchen equipment is my small Lodge cast iron pan, which we use almost everyday! This is honestly the best $15 I have ever spent.

For making water, we have a reverse osmosis water maker onboard that makes about 36 gallons of water/hour. So, we try to run this every few days to keep our tanks topped off.  Do you know how much water you use a day? We do! 🙂 I challenge you to track it for a few days and figure out how you could shave off a couple of gallons. It’s pretty interesting, and there is nothing like limited resources to make you acutely aware of how much you use, so you don’t run out!

Afternoons are usually spent cleaning, cooking, reading, working, writing, swimming or napping. If we are in a harbor or bay where we know people, we might also spend time having an afternoon cocktail or catching up on sailing news and weather. We have a bathtub and two showers on board the boat, but usually, we shower off the back of the boat, after a swim. One of my favorite things on the boat is our outdoor shower nozzle which gives us hot and cold water. Showering outside is a luxury that few people get to experience, but it’s oh so much better than showering inside – give it a try sometime!

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WindyTY screengrab

 

We check the weather multiple times a day. Actually, we are kind of obsessive about it as it changes frequently (well, not in terms of rain or sun but in terms of wind and direction). If we don’t have access to internet, we can download a quick weather file using our satellite phone (we have an Iridium Go) or our SSB Radio. I like to triangulate the sources by checking WindyTY, PredictWind, Windfinder and tide charts.

 

 

 

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As the evening rolls forward, we might play a game, shower, do some laundry or prep for dinner. If we are staying in a marina, we might go out or take a stroll after dinner. While on anchor, we almost always cook, and we can go for days without touching our feet on land, which gives us a bouncy, rolling feeling when we finally do step on land.

And, for years, Kirby has been after me to watch Game of Thrones, but I have resisted,…until now! We have all 7 seasons on a hard drive, and we’ve been watching in the evenings. We are just starting Season 5, and I’m finally hooked. Spoiler Alert: everyone dies! 

 

 

Fixing stuff along the way…Part 2

Jodi and Ginger – keeping us moving ahead

After our brief and rolly stay in Santa Magdalena bay, we thought we were home free. Less than 180 nautical miles to San Jose del Cabo, and with the wind prediction, we could be there in about 30 hours. No problemo.

The winds were perfectly at our backs and howling at around 30 mph; we were flying. At some point, with only the main sail up and reefed, we were doing 8 knots and the boat was performing really well.  The swells were large but behind us, and we knew that if we could keep up that pace, we’d be having tacos for dinner.

Around 3am – Jodi was on watch, Kirby trying to sleep – we hit something. It sounded like a piece of wood/a log hitting the front port side of the boat and then bounced to hit the back of the boat. It was really loud, but it didn’t seem to do any damage, so we didn’t think about it again until around 9am that morning when suddenly, the breaker for all of our electronics and steering went out and when we turned it back on, we had no steering. We quickly looked, and the hydraulic ram base which was fiberglassed into the hull had ripped out.  This caused the linkage to the rudder to become unresponsive.

We were about 50 miles from Cabo, 30 miles offshore in the Pacific Ocean, and no way to steer the boat. Not a fun feeling. At all.  In fact, it made not having an engine feel like child’s play. We quickly hove to (which means you turn the sails and the rudder to allow the boat to stay in one place pointed up into the wind), so we could think about what to do next.

Kirby grabbed his fiberglass supplies and did a quick repair job, but it required curing and drying for 6-8 hours, so we sat in the ocean, bobbing up and down in 8 foot NW swells all day – thinking good thoughts about what might happen later.*

The fiberglass didn’t have enough time to cure, and it was still too soft, so we decided to haul out the emergency tiller. The emergency tiller is a series of large steel pipes that fit together to form a steering mechanism. You place it over the rudder, which happens to be in a compartment under our bed/mattress in the master cabin, leaving the back hatch open, and ruggedly steer the boat under power. We had to do this for about 5 hours, which was exhausting but effective. We named her Ginger and thanked her for her service – grateful to have an alternative because there is no tow service in the open ocean for a boat of our size….

We finally got to Cabo around 1am, where we anchored in the main bay just near Los Arcos. We were grateful to make it safely to this destination where we slept deeply until the next morning – woken by the Cabo vacationers already parasailing and jet skiing.

*SIDE STORY: It was about this time that we looked at the still green organic bananas from Trader Joes hanging in the galley. We had a lot of discussion about whether to bring bananas on our boat. There is an old fisherman’s tale about how unlucky bananas are on a boat, and while we are not superstitious people, we had had so many discussions about these stupid bananas – why aren’t they getting ripe, what is wrong with them, when might they get ripe (it had been almost 2 weeks), will we ever be able to eat them, are they possessed, is there something to this story? So, Jodi decided, with much ceremony, to toss them overboard while we waited for the fiberglass to dry.