Fixing stuff along the way…Part 1

Our new mantra – Never give up. Stay mentally strong. Make it work.

We left Turtle Bay on Tuesday morning and realized we had a problem with our anchor, so we stopped in the middle of the bay to fix it (not a problem – got it fixed), and in a short time, found ourselves completely engulfed in birds – our engine must of scared up fish because there were thousands of them –

Fixing the Crankshaft pully. Bailing wire to the rescue!

making the water black with birds. There were pelicans torpedoing into the water, gulls, terns, and shearwaters. It was a magnificent sight to see, and although we were focused on fixing the anchor, we deliberately took the time to watch and marvel at what we were seeing. Things are like that out at sea. A shit storm brews, and then all of a sudden, you’re rewarded with the most magical experiences reminding us again and again to pay attention, look around, look up, breathe.

Then, about 15 minutes after leaving Turtle Bay, we noticed our alternator stopped charging, and within seconds, the engine was overheating, and the alternator belt had basically burned up….so, here we are, heading out into the Pacific Ocean, with a 2 day passage and no engine. Not a comforting feeling. Our plan was to get into a safe anchorage and then work on it there since it’s nearly impossible to do with 7-10 foot rolling seas. 

There are no perfect anchorages or marinas between here and Cabo San Lucas. There aren’t any towns or people, and there is no internet, so we were hoping to rely on our own ingenuity, the spare parts we had, our satellite phone, and a little luck.

It took us 2 long days to get to Santa Magdalena, and we were excited because we had heard it was a protected bay with good anchorages. Without an engine, we had to sail into the anchorage, and the wind was coming in the absolute opposite direction from where we needed it to for a restful anchorage. We managed to do it perfectly only after sailing back and forth across the bay a few times to get the right angle of approach and then use the wind to stop us before we headed too far into shore – it took us about 4 hours.  

Our anchor held like a champ, but the anchorage was anything but calm. Grey skies, 20 mph winds and swelling seas bounced us around like we were on the ocean. There were a couple of scares in the middle of the night when our collision alarm went off, as fishing/shrimping boats were headed our way but easily went around us. We would complain more about how awful this anchorage was, but we didn’t want to jinx it since our anchor was holding! Late that night, a catamaran came in and anchored near us – they are closer to shore, but it didn’t seem to help them either as they rolled and bucked around like us.

Brett Michaels and McGyver had a baby man child….

The next morning, we had a big breakfast as a reward for making it safely here, and Kirby got to work on the alternator. It turns out that not every bolt was fitted with a washer, so the vibration of use and the ocean must have worked it free enough to create a shimmy that destroyed the belt and could have done damage to the drive shaft. We have a huge box of screws and washers on board in our parts case but nothing that would fix it, and with no one around, and no way to “run to the hardware store”, we had to get creative. So, with a little brainstorming, we decided to give seizing wire a try and wrap it tightly around the head of the screw to create a faux washer – it seemed to do the trick, and the only thing we really need the engine for now is to get us safely out of this anchorage and safely into the marina at San Jose Del Cabo.

Never give up. Stay mentally strong. Make it work.

4 thoughts on “Fixing stuff along the way…Part 1

    1. jodi watson

      Great to hear from you guys! We hope to get to Sutton’s Bay again sometime in the future! Our original happy place ❤️

  1. Sharon Stahlnecker

    Soooo happy that you’re safe and that you have lots of common sense and able to work through all of this. We love you!! XXXXOOOO

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